Gifted and Talented Programs, and Self-Advocacy

I apologize for the tardiness of this post! Some sort of virus got my family sick this week and I have been out for two days! I miss the kiddos, but am glad that we are getting our colds out of the way before the bustle of the Holiday!

In our Book Club Meeting for Gifted Students:

This week in the 5th grade Gifted program we read chapter 4 of “The Survival Guide for Gifted Kids” and discussed our gifted program, other gifted programs out there and how to ADVOCATE for what we need in our education.   We discussed what we see that we appreciate in our current program and talked about how to advocate for ourselves in the current program and in the future when we have needs in the academic setting.

We also looked at the qualifying criteria to get into the gifted program in South-Western City Schools, which can be found here on the district’s website.  While I personally believe that there is merit in providing gifted services to students with high IQ (Intelligence Quotient), I don’t support providing students with their own IQ score as I feel that it is a limited test and the number serves as a ceiling, and providing the number to a child can do more harm than good, since IQ is such a small part of a person’s true intelligence, potential, and work ethic.

While I personally believe that there is merit in providing gifted services to students with high IQ (Intelligence Quotient), I don’t support providing students with their own IQ score as I feel that it is a limited test and the number serves as a ceiling, and providing the number to a child can do more harm than good, since IQ is such a small part of a person’s true intelligence, potential, and work ethic.

If you are interested, there is a high IQ society, MENSA, that many of the students in our program meet the qualifications for membership. To learn more, visit their site: Mensa USA. Please note that I, nor SWCSD is endorsing MENSA, I am simply providing a resource.  While I was browsing their site, I found that they have brain games that some of the students I serve might enjoy. From subject-verb agreement to demolition

While I was browsing the Mensa website, I found that they have brain games that some of the students I serve might enjoy. From subject-verb agreement to demolition division, there are many mind-growing games available on their site for free play.

In Language Arts Gifted Cluster Class

In your student’s language arts class this week, their respective teacher and I are challenging them to write their Holiday Essay’s (Hayes) or their Native American Collaborative Essays (Franklin Woods) to meet the standards outlined on the 6th grade rubric of Informational Text (page 9), if they have shown the ability to complete the tasks outlined on the 5th-grade rubric. This rubric is from our district’s adoption of the Teacher’s College Reading and Writing Program, also known as the Lucy Calkins writing curriculum.

We are also in our 5th week of the Caesar’s English Greek & Latin stems program and students are showing high mastery of the vocabulary and stems that we have studied. I continue to be impressed with each student’s determination to master the new word study concepts by studying regularly, many studying daily! Great job, scholars (and parents, too!)

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