Strong Smarts- Calling Out Each Other’s Multiple Intelligences in Gifted Cluster

“I didn’t realize how well my classmates knew me!” – Olivia, 5th grade

On a recent “Feel Good Fri-YAY!” I gave my students a few sticky notes, enough for each student to write the names of each of their classmates. We had recently taken the “Whiz Quiz” found in The Survival Guide for Gifted Kids by Judy Galbraith (2013) through a Google Form and the students had answered questions about their interests and read Galbraith’s modified descriptions of  Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligence. While the research is out (and in fact, Gardner never intended his theory to be used as a teaching framework) as to whether or not teaching to the different intelligences can be directly causal (versus correlational), it is still fascinating to think about our strengths and work with and in them.

In addition, it feels INCREDIBLE to have others explain what they have noticed in you! That is exactly what we did this past “Feel Good Fri-YAY!”- Each student, using Galbraith’s identified smarts including; music-smarts, picture-smarts, people-smarts, body-smarts, self-smarts, nature-smarts, word-smarts, and number-smarts; we wrote down what they saw in their classmates.stand up and every person shared what they thought the standing student had in terms of smarts. Students were giggly, all smiles, and many mentioned that they didn’t realize how well their classmates knew them, and how they felt so good knowing that others had noticed their strengths.

Each child stood up and every other person shared what they thought the standing student had in terms of smarts. Students were giggly, all smiles, and many mentioned that they didn’t realize how well their classmates knew them, and how they felt so good knowing that others had noticed their strengths.